24Mar/121

FontSize and pixel height in Silverlight for Windows Phone

Recently I came accross the issue where I wanted to limit the number of lines shown in my TextBlock on Windows Phone to for example 3. If the text was longer than 3 lines, the rest of the text should just not be shown. To do this I wanted to set the height of the TextBlock to a fixed height, to be exact 3 times the height of one line. This seems trivial, but to find the height of a line, you need to know something about the way Silverlight measures and calculates heights.

In Silverlight on the desktop and Silverlight for Windows Phone the measuring system is based on pixel units instead of Device Independent Pixel (DIP) units, as it is in WPF. Also the measuring system does not support unit measure string suffixes such as pt, cm or px. Silverlight measurements are always pixel units.

So if we specify the height of a Grid or a TextBlock to be 30 it actually is 30 pixel units. FontSize is no exception to this rule so when you specify 30 as the FontSize, you get a font that from the top of its ascenders to the bottom of its descenders measures approximately 36 pixels. Nevertheless the height of the corresonding TextBlock will be higher, because additional space is used to preserve space between successive lines. This concept is called leading.

In classical typography font sizes are expressed in units of points where a point is almost 1/72th of an inch. Digital typography assumes almost always a value of exactly 1/72th of an inch. This means that text with a font size of 72 points measures approximately 1 inch. Converting between pixels and points is difficult because it depends on the device you are using. Using a printer with 600 dpi (dots per inch) a font with size 72 will measure 600 pixels.

Windows assumes video displayes to have a dpi of 96. Using this assumption one can easily transform pixels into points and the other way around using the following two formulas:

points = 72/96 * pixels = 3/4 * pixels
pixels = 96/72 * points = 4/3 * points

Although Windows Phone screens have a much higher dpi than 96 these formulas also work for the phone. Suppose you want to set a 45 point font. Then you need to set the FontSize property to 60. On top of this Silverlight will add leading, which is approximately 33% of the size set as FontSize, which will result in the height of the TextBlock being 80 pixels.

It is possible to change this behavior by using the LineHeight and LineStackingStrategy properties of a TextBlock. You can read more about it here.

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